Homework: Is It Good for Kids? Here's What the Research Says | Time

 

harris cooper homework

HARRIS COOPER Synthesis of Research on Homework Grade level has a dramatic influence on homework’s effectiveness. In the edition of the Kncyclo- pedia of Educational Research, H J Oito wrote, "compulsory homework does not result in suffi ciently improved academic accom plishments to justify retention" (Otto. Aug 02,  · Harris Cooper is a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University, where he also directs the Program in Education, and author of The Battle Over Homework: Common Ground for Administrators, Teachers, and Parents (Corwin Press). Mar 07,  · Duke Study: Homework Helps Students Succeed in School, As Long as There Isn't Too Much. The study, led by professor Harris Cooper, also shows that the positive correlation is much stronger for secondary students than elementary students.


Duke Study: Homework Helps Students Succeed in School, As Long as There Isn't Too Much | Duke Today


It turns out that parents are right to nag: To succeed in school, kids should do their homework. Duke University researchers have reviewed more than 60 research studies on homework between and and concluded that homework does have a positive effect on student achievement, harris cooper homework.

Harris Cooper, a professor of psychology and director of Duke's Program in Education, harris cooper homework, said the research synthesis that he led showed the positive correlation was much stronger for secondary students those in grades 7 through 12 than those in elementary school.

Cooper is the lead author; Jorgianne Civey Robinson, a Ph. The research was supported by a grant from the U. Department of Education, harris cooper homework. While it's clear that homework is a critical part of the learning process, Cooper said the analysis also showed that too much homework can be counter-productive for students at all levels.

Cooper said the research is consistent with the "minute rule" suggesting the optimum amount of homework that teachers ought to assign. The "minute rule," Cooper said, is a commonly accepted practice in which teachers add 10 minutes of homework as students progress one grade.

In other words, a fourth-grader would be assigned 40 minutes of homework a night, while a high school senior would be assigned about harris cooper homework hours. For upper high school students, after about two hours' worth, harris cooper homework, more homework was not associated with higher achievement. The authors suggest a number of reasons why older students benefit more from homework than younger students. First, the authors note, younger children are less able than older children to tune out distractions in their environment.

Younger children also have less effective study habits. But the reason also could have to do with why elementary teachers assign homework. Perhaps it is used more often to help young students develop better time management and study skills, not to immediately affect their achievement in particular subject areas.

Homework for young students should be short, lead to success without much struggle, occasionally involve parents and, when possible, use out-of-school activities that kids enjoy, such as their sports teams or high-interest reading.

Cooper pointed out that there are limitations to current research on homework. For instance, little research has been done to assess whether a student's race, socioeconomic status or ability level affects the importance of homework in his or her achievement. This is Cooper's second synthesis of homework research. His first was published in harris cooper homework covered nearly studies in the 20 years harris cooper homework Cooper's recent paper reconfirms many of the findings from the earlier study.

Contact: Kelly Gilmer Phone: Email: kelly. Share this story Share this story on facebook Share this story on twitter Share this story on reddit Share this story on linkedin Get this story's permalink Print this story. By Duke Today Staff. Copy and paste the URL below to share this page. Select URL.

 

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harris cooper homework

 

Harris Cooper received his Ph.D. in Social Psychology from the University of Connecticut in From to , he was on the faculty at the University of Missouri. In , he moved to Duke University where he is a professor in the Department of Psychology & Neuroscience and served as Director of the Program in Education from to Mar 07,  · Duke Study: Homework Helps Students Succeed in School, As Long as There Isn't Too Much. The study, led by professor Harris Cooper, also shows that the positive correlation is much stronger for secondary students than elementary students. Harris Cooper, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University, is author of “The Battle Over Homework: Common Ground for Administrators, Teachers and Parents.” SHARE COPY LINK.